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Video Interview

Dr Oivind Jans

For 16:9 format video

 

 

What role do anaesthetists play in enhanced recovery programmes?

Anaesthetists play a major role in enhanced recovery because they are usually experts in pain relief and anaesthetics. In many hospitals they decide together with surgeons what are the best modality for pain relief in this group of patients, so in that sense they play a role, and also of course the anaesthesia is fairly standard now with regional anaesthesia, but things like flu therapy and also transfusion in the in the post-operative phase,... anaesthetists play a large role there. The trend in anaesthesiology is now were going more into peri-operative medicine, not only doing anaesthesia but also making sure the patient is ready and optimised before the operation and following the patients for a longer period after the operation is done, sometimes even on the wards themselves, so were helping out the surgeons with these issues.

 

How do you think we can speed up the implementation of results from scientific clinical studies?

Yeah of course first of all you need the data, but the data is not enough, so if you want to speed up the implementation of enhanced recovery also you need the support from the management of the hospitals, they need to know what it’s about, what can they gain from it and what do we need to do it and the most important factor is probably to understand that this is a multi-disciplinary approach, so have to take on board every other group of workers at the hospital – of course the doctors, but also nurses, physiotherapists and so forth and you have to sit together and agree this is the way to do it and everybody agrees because then you’ll have the support from all members of staff. And you Then you have to create the logistics around it which is challenging, but that’s the way to do it

Video Information

Interview with Oivind Jans, Anaesthesiologist in training and Research fellow

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