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Knee Replacement Options

There are two types of knee replacements:

Total Knee Replacement
The knee joint is one of the largest and most complex joints in the body. The knee is made up of the lower end of the thigh bone (femur) which rotates on the upper end of the shin bone (tibia) and the kneecap (patella) which slides in a groove on the end of the femur. Large ligaments attached to the femur and the tibia provide stability. The long thigh muscles give the knee strength.

Total knee replacement involves replacing the injured or damaged part of the knee with artificial parts. Your new knee will consist of a metal component on the end of your thigh bone, a metal and plastic spacer on the upper end of the shin bone and if needed a plastic button on the kneecap.

Your Surgeon may recommend joint replacement surgery if you have significant arthritis.  Joint replacement implants to resurface the joint are typically made from metal alloy and polyethylene (plastic). The implants are designed to restore function and eliminate as much discomfort as possible while allowing you to return to a more active lifestyle.

Partial Knee Replacement
The knee is composed of three separate compartments. Osteoarthritis sometimes develops in only one compartment of the knee, while the other two compartments remain relatively healthy. Patients who have osteoarthritis in only one compartment may be candidates for partial knee replacement.

A partial knee replacement involves resurfacing only the part of the knee that is worn.  This operation is usually carried out if only part of the knee is worn.

The advantage of a partial knee is that it resurfaces only the damaged cartilage of the knee, preserving the undamaged cartilage. The benefits of this procedure include a smaller incision (3, 4 inches), a quicker recovery, and less bone removal. Your surgeon will determine if a partial knee is appropriate for you.  To find further information on partial knee replacement, go to www.oxfordknee.net.


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